In The Salt Mines – A Students Profound Insight

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In The Salt Mines – A Students Profound Insight

A student graciously agrees to share an intimate insight with all, affording us a direct glimpse into the ‘heat of the kitchen’ and the intimacy of the soul.

The most profound insights emerge after having invested long, hard work into getting to know our mind. They come up in the intimacy of one’s relationship with oneself. They often have universal appeal and importance, helping us to not feel alone on this difficult journey of mindfulness.

Students often come up with life-changing insights and experiences that transform their lives forever. Sometimes they actually formulate it so compellingly and well, that I could not have expressed it any better. Here is such an example I just recently received by e-mail from a meditation student. I am very grateful that he allowed me to publish it.

“Dr. T.,
I always thought the ground under my feet was solid. Thanks to you, it turns out to be nothing but a trap door!
I never expected to deem my ‘ruin’ [the fact that never again can he see things the same way he used to see them] a gift.
But, aside from bringing me to my knees, it brought me here.
And now, I can’t go back to what I knew, because you’ve made that a heap of smoking rubble.
I can’t stay where I am, because that’s a bleak shroud of despair (and no, I’m not being histrionic).
I can only move forward into the absolute unknown.
The only way to do that, is to change. And frankly, change sucks. I would much prefer to ascend poetically from the lowest point in my life in a tidy, straight line. Instead, it’s bloody exhausting … and messy … and jerky … and unpredictable. But it is a trajectory nonetheless … and as I crawl and bawl, shedding whatever (and whomever) I need to, I remind myself that the general direction … is indeed up and out.”

Copyright © 2018 by Dr. Stéphane Treyvaud. All rights reserved.

By |2018-06-19T12:17:32+00:00June 19th, 2018|By students, Short reflections|